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Remonstrance

Remonstrance is a podcast dedicated to Wesleyan-Arminian Reformation. On the show we will discuss theology from a Wesleyan-Arminian perspective focusing on topics such as soteriology, eschatology, and church history, all over a good cup of coffee. Interested in finding out about what Wesleyan-Arminian Theology actually is? Then download, subscribe, and join the #Remonstrance.
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Now displaying: December, 2018
Dec 18, 2018

In this episode we will continue to discuss the dangers of "Perfectionism" and show how it is altogether different from Wesley's doctrine of Christian Perfection. We will begin by discussing T.A. Noble's book, "Holy Trinity: Holy People" and how Wesley very guardedly affirmed that Christians are "at once a sinner and justified." This of course can degenerate into Antinomianism and Wesley guarded strongly against that but also affirmed it in a way that guarded his teaching from Perfectionism. We then interact with Thomas Oden and discuss what Christian Perfection is not. We end by using Fred Sanders to illustrate the we must choose between the dangers of Perfection or Anti-Perfection.

Dec 11, 2018

In this episode we will be discussing the dangers of "Perfectionism" and show how it is different from Wesley's teachings on "Christian Perfection." There are five major dangers of Perfectionism:

  1. It creates two “classes” of Christians
  2. It leads people to think they no longer need a Savior
  3. It leads to pride and superiority
  4. It puts an emphasis on works
  5. It leads to spiritual elitism

We will discuss how trying to teach "Christian Perfection" is like trying to defuse a bomb. We need to be careful and study to show ourselves approved. We then look at what Wesley taught about "Christian Perfection" and illustrate that it was both different from "Perfectionism" and serves as a corrective to it. 

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